Summary

Jason is a former federal prosecutor and experienced trial attorney who represents individuals and corporations in a variety of litigation matters, including criminal investigations, regulatory enforcement actions, and internal investigations. Prior to joining Taft, he spent more than a decade with the federal government, serving the last six years as a white-collar prosecutor with the U.S. Department of Justice’s (DOJ) Criminal Division, Fraud Section, and before that, as an enforcement attorney with the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC). Jason leverages that experience and knowledge to provide clients with the full range of advice and guidance needed to navigate the ever-increasing complexity of the federal regulatory and criminal justice systems.

At the DOJ, Jason served as a prosecutor in the Market Integrity and Major Frauds unit, where he investigated and prosecuted individuals and corporations engaged in complex white-collar matters, including securities fraud, accounting fraud, investment fraud, bank fraud, environmental fraud, insider trading, FCPA violations, and money laundering. In this role, Jason gained extensive experience with the OCC, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and other federal regulatory agencies, as well as with cross-border matters, involving INTERPOL, extradition proceedings, and Mutual Legal Assistance Treaty (MLAT) requests with foreign governments. While at the DOJ, he also served as a Special Assistant U.S. Attorney for the United States Attorney's Office for the District of Columbia.

Before joining the DOJ, Jason served as an OCC enforcement attorney located in its Washington, D.C. headquarters. At the OCC, he investigated nationally chartered banks and thrifts and institution-affiliated parties (IAPs) and negotiated institutional and individual administrative enforcement actions. His experience at the OCC included matters related to unsafe and unsound banking activities, compliance with the Bank Secrecy Act, and violations of other federal regulations and statutes. In this role, Jason worked closely with OCC examiners and regional counsel, which included a detail to the OCC’s Central District, located in Chicago, Illinois.

Jason is a graduate of Indiana University (B.A., summa cum laude) and Indiana University Maurer School of Law (J.D., magna cum laude). Following law school, he clerked for the Hon. Roger L. Wollman of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit, and for the Hon. Joseph H. McKinley, Jr. of the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Kentucky.

Admitted in Indiana only. 

All Service Areas

Education

  • Indiana University Maurer School of Law (2010)

    magna cum laude
    Order of the Coif

  • Indiana University (2007)

    summa cum laude
    Phi Beta Kappa

Admissions

  • State - Indiana
  • Federal - Northern District of Indiana
  • Federal - Southern District of Indiana
  • Federal - Eastern District of Michigan

Notable Matters

Representative Experience Prior to Joining Taft

  • Prosecuted one of the world’s largest automakers, and three of its senior managers, in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan, for their roles in a conspiracy to mislead the EPA and defraud U.S. customers regarding the emissions control software and fuel efficiency of more than 100,000 diesel vehicles. Negotiated and secured a corporate resolution with the international automaker that resulted in the company entering a guilty plea and paying nearly $300 million in criminal monetary penalties.
  • Prosecuted the former CFO and former VP of Finance of a publicly traded consumer finance company in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Florida. Both the former CFO and VP of Finance pled guilty after indictment, admitting to conspiring to fraudulently inflate the company’s earnings and revenue by initiating a series of sham transactions at the end of each quarter. Negotiated and secured a corporate resolution with the company’s successor-in-interest that resulted in the company entering a non-prosecution agreement and paying $28 million in restitution and criminal monetary penalties.
  • Prosecuted the former Executive VP of a publicly traded Canadian oil-services company, in the U.S. District Court for the District of North Dakota, for his role in a securities and wire fraud scheme that caused more than $886 million in investor losses. The former Executive VP pled guilty after indictment to securities fraud and wire fraud, admitting that he falsely inflated the company’s publicly reported quarterly earnings by reporting approximately $100 million in revenue from purported long-term contracts that either did not exist or were not collectible.
  • Prosecuted the former managing director of residential lending, and two top-producing loan officers, in the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California and the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan, for their roles in a widespread bank fraud conspiracy related to the origination of more than $876 million in fraudulent mortgage loans. All three defendants pled guilty to conspiracy to commit bank fraud and wire fraud.
  • Prosecuted the president of a Los Angeles startup company, in the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California, for misappropriating funds from a $7.25 million SBA Paycheck Protection Program loan. Obtained a conviction on all four counts of wire fraud following a jury trial.
  • Prosecuted two members of an international telemarketing sweepstakes fraud scheme, in the U.S. District Court for the Western District of North Carolina, for their roles in defrauding elderly victims in the United States. Both defendants, who operated the fraud scheme from Costa Rica, pled guilty after indictment to conspiracy to commit wire fraud, admitting that they defrauded vulnerable elderly victims out of more than $9 million, including through the use of Voice-Over-IP (VOIP) technology that masked the defendants’ true international location.
  • Prosecuted the former chairman and managing partner of an energy company, in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California, for orchestrating a $15 million Ponzi scheme. The former managing partner pled guilty after indictment for wire fraud, admitting that he caused more than 50 investors to suffer approximately $15 million in losses.